Missouri Invasive Plant Task Force (MoIP) - to identify and control invasive plants

Members

Active Missouri Invasive Plant Task Force members meet four times each year to develop a strategy to address invasive plants in the state of Missouri.

MoIP Members

Dates for 2021 quarterly meetings: January 7, April 7, July 7, and October 7

MoIP Advisory Members

Government employees do not have “voting” power, but provide advisory information to the task force steering committee and participate in informal conversation about invasive plant work.

Cease the Sale Group

  • Carol Davit
  • Matt Arndt
  • Malissa Briggler
  • Bruce Schuette
  • Bill Ruppert
  • Roxie Campbell
  • Susan Ehlenbeck
  • Christopher Pierce

for more information: [email protected]

Organizing Chair: Bill Ruppert, National Nursery Products – St. Louis

• Chair: Carol Davit, Missouri Prairie Foundation

• Vice-Chair: Matt Arndt, Missouri Consulting Foresters Association

• Inaugural Members: Nate Muenks, Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC); Anastasia Becker, private citizen and entomologist (formerly Missouri Department of Agriculture); Ken McCarty, Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR); Carol Davit, Missouri Prairie Foundation

Please note: in Spring 2020, we began inviting more organizations to join us for a stakeholder meeting; while complications arose while planning this meeting during nationwide COVID-19 quarantine, we intend to continue expanding our reach with agencies, organizations, and key individuals across the state.

Member and Stakeholder Roles: Active Missouri Invasive Plant Task Force members meet four times each year to develop a strategy to address invasive plant species in the state of Missouri.

Stakeholders receive communication from MoIP members, offer their expertise and share updates with their colleagues.

The diversity of MoIP—from plant industry professionals to state- and federal-employed conservation, transportation and agriculture leaders—helps maximize the informational and geographic capabilities to combat invasive exotic plants across the state.

Members should be primarily concerned with statewide management or have specific expertise and skills that are valuable to review documents, take part in subgroups and work on overarching, statewide changes. They are added by consensus of the existing member group.