Missouri Invasive Plant Task Force (MoIP) - to identify and control the invasive plant species that severely impact native biodiversity

Tina Casagrand

Greenbelt Land Trust of Mid-Missouri Honeysuckle Work Day

by Tina Casagrand 0 Comments

Green Belt Land Trust wants to let you know about an opportunity to do some good work and help out a conservation easement landowner by clearing invasive honeysuckle on Saturday, November 11th, from 10AM to noon.

They will be led by Fred Young, honeysuckle exterminator extraordinaire, and Greenbelt will provide the necessary equipment.  However, if you have your own loppers and work gloves, feel free to bring those, too!

Please RSVP by emailing mpowell[at]greenbeltmissouri.org, and he will send you information on where to meet.

Spotlight on Emmenegger Nature Park invasive plant efforts

From Gwyn Wahlmann:
Emmenegger Nature Park is a 110-acre wooded park in Kirkwood, Missouri, located on the Meramec River and endowed with unusual natural beauty and biological diversity.
As an “adopt-a-park” subset of Kirkwood Parks Assistance Corps (KPAC), a small crew of regular volunteers has been removing honeysuckle at Emmenegger for 4-5 years.  We have worked every Sunday, March through May, and September through November.  Two of our crew also work there during the week throughout the seasons.
Upon occasion we have been joined by students from Kirkwood High School and Meramec Community College, and volunteer participants with Biodiversity St. Louis “Honeysuckle Sweep Week.”
It would be impossible to know how many honeysuckle shrubs we’ve removed, but like most natural areas in the St. Louis region, the park was heavily infested.  An estimate from Kirkwood Parks Department is that we’ve cleared about a third of the park, as many as 30 acres.
We also remove euonymus, garlic mustard, Callery Pear, Burning Bush, Japanese Beefsteak Plant and other known exotic invasives.
Visit our page for MoIP invasive plant case sites, including detailed management procedures and “before and after” photos.

Honeysuckle Hackathon 2017 and other St. Louis-Area invasive plant initiatives

by Tina Casagrand 0 Comments

“It’s a leaf-out freakout,” begins a St. Louis Post-Dispatch article posted March 13. As described in, “St. Louis residents beat back invasive honeysuckle as spring nears,” organizations across the city are engaged in removal of this prolific and highly invasive plant.

Kirkwood Honeysuckle Hackathon

Hack12

Photo by Robert Weaver, The Gateway Gardener

The Kirkwood Parks Assistance Corps’ Honeysuckle Hackathon met with great success. Over 100 volunteers showed up in the course of a week. Here are some documents they used that may prove helpful in other community invasive plant removal efforts:

See more photos, click here. Photos of Meramec students helping on Thursday are here. To download the whole gallery, click on the downward arrow next to the “Buy Photos” button. To download individual photos click on the photo then on the downward arrow at bottom right page.

What’s Next

There are still some work dates set for St. Louis Wild Ones Honeysuckle Sweep week.

And finally, check out this video by Great Rivers Greenway and share with your networks!

Learn more about exotic honeysuckles on MoIP’s species-specific information page.

Illinois Invasive Species Symposium Call for Abstracts, due April 3

by Tina Casagrand 0 Comments
 
The symposium will be held on May 31 in Champaign, IL.  
 
 
Call for Abstracts
 
We are now accepting abstract submissions for presentations at the 4th Annual Illinois Invasive Species Symposium. The Symposium is a joint effort between University of Illinois Extension, the Illinois Natural History Survey, and The Morton Arboretum. It provides an opportunity to learn about projects and programs underway to address invasive species that are impacting Illinois’ natural lands and native species.
 
Presentations should be on invasive species projects or programs in Illinois. We are accepting sub-missions of presentations on all taxa of invasive species. Presentations will be 20-30 minutes in length.
 
Please email abstract submissions to cwevans [at] illinois.edu by April 3, 2017. Authors will be notified by April 17.
 
Abstract Format
1. Title
2. Authors: Include author names and contact information. If there are multiple authors, please place an asterisk (*) after the name of the presenter(s)
3. Body of abstract: Body of abstract should be a single paragraph and provide a brief description of the presentation
 
Christopher Evans
Forestry Extension and Research Specialist
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Sciences
 
University of Illinois Extension Forestry
354 State Highway 145N
Simpson, IL 62985-9614

Rock Bridge Memorial State Park volunteer opportunities

by Tina Casagrand 0 Comments

Rock Bridge Memorial State Park is being threatened like never before by invasive plants and needs your help!  If you haven’t considered doing invasive plant control volunteering before, the attachments will give you a good understanding of what’s involved.  While we can’t spray this time of year, it does work to use cut/stump and pulling methods in winter as long as it’s above freezing and the ground isn’t frozen.  It’s also a good time to give attention to some species/small projects that don’t get much attention during the growing season.

Attached are two planning docs that give details about locations/species/methods for work that needs to be done.  The map shows locations of 3 spots along Clear Creek that need winter creeper pulled.  This is an example of maps I can make as needed to help you find a particular location or I can take you out and show you a site that needs work.  Notice the instructions doc.  Please let me know what task you are willing to tackle and report when it’s done so I can keep this up to date and serve as a coordinator.  If you can’t help directly, perhaps you can forward this on to others who can.

I want to thank those of you who have been working on invasive plant control.  I’m estimating that we spot sprayed bush honeysuckle on about 300 acres in the Eastern part of the Gans Creek Wild Area this fall after natives lost their leaves!  And our SPYC crew worked all summer with various species and methods.  Having worked here for 25 years, I know of many locations that are in good shape today that would have become grown up in invasive plants except that we intervened on behalf of our native plants and animals.  Let’s keep doing that!

To join the effort, call or email Roxie Campbell, park naturalist:

Roxie Campbell

Park Naturalist

Rock Bridge Memorial State Park

5901 S. Hwy. 163

Columbia, MO 65203

573-449-7400

[email protected]

You will need to fill out and send the following forms to Roxie:

Decision to deregulate creeping bentgrass

by Tina Casagrand 0 Comments

Environmental groups blasted USDA’s Jan. 17 decision to deregulate a genetically engineered creeping bentgrass that has taken root in two Oregon counties.

In a joint news release, the Center for Biological Diversity and Center for Food Safety sharply criticized USDA’s decision to deregulate the grass, which was genetically modified to resist applications of glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto Corp.’s Roundup weed killer.

Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. and Monsanto developed the grass for use mainly on golf courses. —Read the rest of the article.

A 12/8/2016 Capital Press Ag news article documented the decision to deregulate the genetically engineered glyphosate-resistant creeping bentgrass will be made by the USDA Secretary of Agriculture after the close of the final public comment period. Download the rest of the article.

More on Agrostis stolonifer (creeping bentgrass):

SEAN ELLIS/CAPITAL PRESS

SEAN ELLIS/CAPITAL PRESS