Missouri Invasive Plant Task Force (MoIP) - to identify and control the invasive plant species that severely impact native biodiversity

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Trial of Bush Honeysuckle

by Tina Casagrand 0 Comments
HS Trial Flyer2018 - 3Color
Please Note: This trial is for education, yet the foundations of the trial can lead toward actual litigation.
Respecting the role of the judicial system to bring about change and honoring the history of the place the trial is taking  place in are of great importance.
This is just a little bit of information but spread the word.

Honeysuckle Sweep, St. Louis region

by Tina Casagrand 0 Comments
Honeysuckle Sweep, St. Louis region

In an effort to energize the greater St. Louis region around improving habitat for our native plants and animals, area conservation organizations join together to spotlight invasive bush honeysuckle and the need to remove it so that large swaths of land can become productive areas for native habitat, recreation and enjoyment. To that end, organizations will host public events and volunteer removal days during Honeysuckle Sweep Weeks.

2018 Honeysuckle Sweep Weeks will be :

Spring: March 3–18, 2018

Fall: October 27–November 11, 2018

Spotlight on Emmenegger Nature Park invasive plant efforts

by MoIP 0 Comments
From Gwyn Wahlmann:
Emmenegger Nature Park is a 110-acre wooded park in Kirkwood, Missouri, located on the Meramec River and endowed with unusual natural beauty and biological diversity.
As an “adopt-a-park” subset of Kirkwood Parks Assistance Corps (KPAC), a small crew of regular volunteers has been removing honeysuckle at Emmenegger for 4-5 years.  We have worked every Sunday, March through May, and September through November.  Two of our crew also work there during the week throughout the seasons.
Upon occasion we have been joined by students from Kirkwood High School and Meramec Community College, and volunteer participants with Biodiversity St. Louis “Honeysuckle Sweep Week.”
It would be impossible to know how many honeysuckle shrubs we’ve removed, but like most natural areas in the St. Louis region, the park was heavily infested.  An estimate from Kirkwood Parks Department is that we’ve cleared about a third of the park, as many as 30 acres.
We also remove euonymus, garlic mustard, Callery Pear, Burning Bush, Japanese Beefsteak Plant and other known exotic invasives.
Visit our page for MoIP invasive plant case sites, including detailed management procedures and “before and after” photos.