A message from Roxie (Peveler) Campbell who grew up in Montgomery County near Bellflower, MO.  Training provided by Missouri State Parks.  Visit at MoStateParks.com.

Non-native, aggressively-spreading plants make it difficult for people to use land as they wish, and take time and money to control. These plants are not just another plant in the woods; they are superweeds that steal sunlight, water and nutrients and some even release harmful chemicals. These effects cause a decrease in the growth rate and reproduction of native trees and plants which, in turn, reduces food and habitat for wildlife. For example, deer and turkey eat acorns produced by oak trees which are currently very abundant in our woodlands; however, if the forest floor becomes shaded, other shade-tolerant tree species will grow instead. Invasive plants harm your ability to hunt, fish, walk easily in the woods and keep you from enjoying the view of an open oak woodland. Pasture, other agricultural lands and the development of land are also affected by unwanted trees and plants. Now is the time to act before invasive plants become too numerous. Will you be part of the solution and help conserve Missouri’s landscape for future generations and protect places that are important to you?

Get started today and learn more by choosing from of one of these opportunities:

  • Attend the training provided by Missouri State Parks’ staff from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 22.  The training will begin at the Montgomery City Public Library with an indoor presentation followed by visiting outdoor sites, including Graham Cave State Park, to see several invasive plants, learn to identify them and how to treat them. To sign up, call 573-564-3476. It’s free, but space is limited.
  • Make an appointment with your Department of Conservation (MDC) private lands conservationist who will visit with you, assess invasive plants on your land and provide professional guidance.  Find your local MDC contact at mdc.mo.gov.
  • Visit www.moinvasives.org to find more invasive plant resources from the Missouri Invasive Plant Task Force.

 

Protect Our Places

bush honeysuckle illustrations

Bush honeysuckle identification illustrations by Jan Weaver