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Good News for 2020: Individuals and Groups Recognized for Invasive Plant Action in Missouri

by Tina Casagrand

Contact: Tina Casagrand, 417-299-1794, [email protected]

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Good News for 2020: Individuals and Groups Recognized for Invasive Plant Action in Missouri

Awards program of the Missouri Invasive Plant Task Force recognizes exemplary work in invasive plant early detection and control. 

JEFFERSON CITY (November 12, 2019)—As public awareness grows about the harmful effects of invasive plants, the Missouri Invasive Plant Task Force (MoIP) recognized two individuals and one group in Missouri who have exhibited outstanding work controlling invasive plants on property across the state.

 

2020 Invasive Plant Action Award for Individual Citizen: Jason Bryan

MoIP members chose Boone County landowner Jason Bryan as the recipient of the Individual Citizen award. “Like most landowners I deal with, Jason was interested in managing his property for better wildlife habitat to increase deer and turkey use, but most importantly he wanted to leave the property in better shape that it currently was,” Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) Private Land Conservationist Ryan Lueckenhoff wrote in his nomination. He noted that multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora), wintercreeper (Euonymus fortunei `Coloratus’) and bush honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii and Lonicera x bella) were common through the wooded areas on the property, and they were getting worse. On one rocky outcrop, Lueckenhoff says, “Bush honeysuckle was so thick that you could not see from the top of the hillside through to the bottom and little to no wildlife were using the area.” He worked with Bryan to develop a 10-year plan for the property, with invasive species removal at the top of the list. The Bryan family started removing invasive plants the first year and have seen incredible success, with new visibility and returned wildlife.

hillside after invasive honeysuckle treatment

Hillside in which honeysuckle was covering the rock faces, which are in the background. Sixty percent of honeysuckle had a 4-7’’ base. Bryan used a hack and squirt method to treat the invasive plants and anticipates needing to follow up with spraying new shoots in a year. Photo provided by Jason Bryan.

Members of MoIP have gathered resources, tools, and guides that help landowners understand, assess, and manage invasive and exotic plants  commonly found in Missouri, including those found on Bryan’s property. Lueckenhoff added that Bryan understands the importance of follow-up treatments. “His commitment to this removal effort has been awesome to see!”

 

2020 Invasive Plant Action Award for Individual Professional: Roger Frazier

MDC and MoDOT crews on right of way

Spearheading the development of the Southeast Missouri Region Invasive Species Strike Team is just one of Roger Frazier’s invasive plant accomplishments. Photo provided by Jan Dellamano.

MoIP is proud to present MDC Priority Habitat Coordinator Roger Frazier with the Individual Professional award. “Roger Frazier has a long history of supporting Conservation for all the right reasons,” writes MDC private land services chief Jason Jensen in his nomination. “For him, it is not just a job, and not even just a profession; it is his passion and his lifelong commitment to protect, conserve, and serve Missouri’s Natural Heritage. But putting all that aside, we are nominating him for this award because of his recent efforts that have gone way beyond even what the most demanding of us would call above and beyond.”

Among Frazier’s invasive plant success stories are: 

  • developing the Southeast Missouri Region Invasive Species Strike Team. Notable for acting early on preventing several invasive plants (primarily common teaselDipsacus fullonum; cutleaf teaselDipsacus laciniatus; and spotted knapweedCentaurea stoebe) from spreading throughout the Southeast region, thus protecting Conservation Opportunity Areas. Frazier worked closely and tirelessly with the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) to manage highway right of ways for preventing the species’ spread.
  • serving as a member of MDC’s Invasive Species Coordination Team since its inception.
  • helping to start and secure funding for the Scenic Rivers Invasive Species Partnership, and
  • working with the City of Farmington and AmeriCorps on the Engler Park Eradication project.

Furthermore, Frazier’s duties as Priority Habitat Coordinator have kept him continually engaged with both MDC and Natural Resources Conservation Service staff on invasive species management on private land. “For those of us that work alongside Roger, even these words do not fully express the level of commitment and contribution Roger has made towards true invasive species management in Missouri,” Jensen writes.

 

2020 Invasive Plant Action Award for Group Collaboration: Jason Jensen, Jan Dellamano, Roger Frazier, Chris Rutledge, Mark Auffenberg, and Tony Jaco

mule vehicle and spraying invasives on roadside

Two state agencies and a nonprofit organization are engaged in a long-term project to address the growing problem of invasive plant spread on highway rights-of-ways. Photo provided by Chris Rutledge.

This group collaboration started in 2007 as a grassroots effort led by Jan Dellamano and the local MoDOT shed. Over the years, it has transformed into a long-term commitment to address the growing problem of invasive plant spread on highway rights-of-ways (ROW). This effort has been effective in stopping the spread of extremely invasive plants such as spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe L. subsp. micranthos) and teasel (Dipsacus fullonum L. and D. laciniatus)

This project has had many facets including conceptualizing, planning, gaining and developing administrative and budgetary support, equipment, and implementation on the ground.  All of this occurred with the cooperation of two state agencies (MDC and MoDOT), and a nonprofit organization, the Missouri Prairie Foundation (MPF). (MPF is excluded from the award, due to the nature of MoIP’s being housed under MPF’s Grow Native! program). 

I drive I-55 between Cape Girardeau to St. Louis with regularity, and I can see a clear difference between areas impacted by this arrangement and those that have no such treatment,” writes Tony Jaco, Southeast Regional Administrator for MDC, in his nomination. “I have witnessed a decline of teasel, sericia lespedeza, autumn olive, and spotted knapweed. This impacts the area treated with herbicides specifically, but it has a larger reach as the mowing equipment used by MODOT will not have carry as much seed debris from invasives which leads to spread of the invasives. It also benefits the watersheds I-55 touches because seed stock will not be flowing down stream to infect new properties.”

This pilot program has caught on and is being considered and/ or replicated in other parts of the state. 

 

The Action Awards seek to demonstrate how controlling the spread of  invasive plants on Missouri farms, forests, woodlands, prairies, gardens, roadsides and along waterways is wise stewardship. A recommendation by a natural resource professional is required to be eligible. Members of MoIP evaluate nominations. “There are many individuals and groups carrying out impressive invasive plant control in every corner of the state,” says Carol Davit, chair of MoIP and executive director of the Missouri Prairie Foundation. “We want to recognize those doing exemplary work and present them with an aware at an event of the awardee’s choice to be honored in front of their peers.”

By definition, invasive plants are those not native to a region whose abundance and/or rapid spread  harm economic and environmental resources. For more information on the awards program, please visit https://moinvasives.org/moip-invasive-plant-action-awards/

 

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The Missouri Invasive Plant Task Force (MoIP) is a resource of Grow Native!—a 19-year-old native plant marketing and education program serving the lower Midwest. Grow Native! is administratively housed by the nonprofit Missouri Prairie Foundation. For more information about MoIP, visit www.moinvasives.org, email [email protected] or call 417-299-1794; for more on the Grow Native! program at grownative.org or for more on the Missouri Prairie Foundation visit moprairie.org.

Awards Presented for Invasive Plant Action in Missouri

by Tina Casagrand
Awards Presented for Invasive Plant Action in Missouri
Socially distanced members of the award-winning team pictured above are (front, kneeling, from let): Kara Tvedt, Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), Nate Muenks MDC and MoIP, Tyler Goodwyn, Greene County. (Standing, from left) Glen Locke, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Roddy Rogers, City Utilities of Springfield; Mike Kromrey, Watershed Committee of the Ozarks; Brent Stock, James River Basin Partnership; Ashton Stamper, Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources.

New awards program of the Missouri Invasive Plant Task Force to recognize exemplary work in invasive plant early detection and control. 

As public awareness grows about the harmful effects of invasive plants, the Missouri Invasive Plant Task Force (MoIP) bestowed new awards this year to recognize outstanding work controlling invasive plant species on property in Missouri. 

MoIP Chair Carol Davit presented Columbia Public Schools K-12 Science Coordinator Mike Szydlowski with the Invasive Plant Action Award for an Individual during the district’s October 12 school board meeting. Past Vice-chair Nate Muenks presented the Southwest Missouri Hydrilla Working Group with the Invasive Plant Action Award for a Collaborative Group during the Fellows Lake Hydrilla Event on August 12.

Carol Davit and Mike Szydlowski stand for invasive plant award

MoIP Chair Carol Davit poses for a socially distanced photo with Mike Szydlowski, who won the first MoIP Action Award for Individuals.

Szydlowski coordinated science teachers and students in a district-wide effort to remove invasive bush honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii and Lonicera x bella). According to the Missouri Botanical Garden, “Woodlands invaded by bush honeysuckle have dramatically reduced diversity and abundance of native plants compared to uninvaded woodlands, and severe infestations develop into impenetrable thickets in which native plants are almost completely eliminated.” Szydlowski’s project is responsible for eradicating approximately 2 million plants. In 2019 the project’s student volunteers accumulated a little over 7,000 service hours. 

hydrilla working group stand for award

Socially distanced members of the award-winning team pictured above are (front, kneeling, from let): Kara Tvedt, Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), Nate Muenks MDC and MoIP, Tyler Goodwyn, Greene County. (Standing, from left) Glen Locke, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Roddy Rogers, City Utilities of Springfield; Mike Kromrey, Watershed Committee of the Ozarks; Brent Stock, James River Basin Partnership; Ashton Stamper, Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources.

The Southwest Missouri Hydrilla Working Group is a collaborative effort among representatives from City Utilities of Springfield, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources—Southwest Regional Office, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Pomme de Terre and Stockton Lake), Greene County, Watershed Committee of the Ozarks, the James River Basin Partnership, and the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) to detect and manage Hydrilla. In the summer of 2012, the exotic invasive plant hydrilla was verified in several private impoundments along South Fork, a headwater tributary to the Pomme de Terre River in rural Greene County, Missouri.  Since then, it has been detected in impoundments in the upper Pomme de Terre River, Little Sac River, James River, and Niangua River watersheds. Currently, hydrilla has been found in 35 sites in southwest Missouri. 

Hydrilla’s dense vegetative mats can clog intake structures at water power generation and water supply facilities and can also have negative impacts on recreational boating. States with heavy hydrilla infestations are spending millions of dollars annually to control hydrilla, which is frequently referred to as “the worst aquatic weed in the country.” A significant highlight for the Hydrilla Eradication project in 2019 was the addition of several more sites to the “monitoring-only” phase. Nate Muenks, MDC’s natural resource management planner and past vice-chair of MoIP, presented the working group with its award in August.

A recommendation by a natural resource professional is required to be eligible. Members of MoIP evaluate nominations. MoIP is a resource of the Grow Native! program and the Missouri Prairie Foundation. 

“There are many individuals and groups carrying out impressive invasive species control in every corner of the state,” says Carol Davit, chair of MoIP and executive director of the Missouri Prairie Foundation. “We want to recognize those doing exemplary work and present them with an aware at an event of the awardee’s choice to be honored in front of their peers.”

By definition, invasive plants are those not native to a region whose abundance and/or rapid spread  harm economic and environmental resources. The Action Awards seek to demonstrate how controlling the spread of  invasive plants on Missouri farms, forests, woodlands, prairies, gardens, roadsides and along waterways is wise stewardship. 

For more information, please visit our Invasive Plant Action Awards page.

Training Opportunity: How to Stop Invading Superweeds

by Tina Casagrand

A message from Roxie (Peveler) Campbell who grew up in Montgomery County near Bellflower, MO.  Training provided by Missouri State Parks.  Visit at MoStateParks.com.

Non-native, aggressively-spreading plants make it difficult for people to use land as they wish, and take time and money to control. These plants are not just another plant in the woods; they are superweeds that steal sunlight, water and nutrients and some even release harmful chemicals. These effects cause a decrease in the growth rate and reproduction of native trees and plants which, in turn, reduces food and habitat for wildlife. For example, deer and turkey eat acorns produced by oak trees which are currently very abundant in our woodlands; however, if the forest floor becomes shaded, other shade-tolerant tree species will grow instead. Invasive plants harm your ability to hunt, fish, walk easily in the woods and keep you from enjoying the view of an open oak woodland. Pasture, other agricultural lands and the development of land are also affected by unwanted trees and plants. Now is the time to act before invasive plants become too numerous. Will you be part of the solution and help conserve Missouri’s landscape for future generations and protect places that are important to you?

Get started today and learn more by choosing from of one of these opportunities:

  • Attend the training provided by Missouri State Parks’ staff from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 22.  The training will begin at the Montgomery City Public Library with an indoor presentation followed by visiting outdoor sites, including Graham Cave State Park, to see several invasive plants, learn to identify them and how to treat them. To sign up, call 573-564-3476. It’s free, but space is limited.
  • Make an appointment with your Department of Conservation (MDC) private lands conservationist who will visit with you, assess invasive plants on your land and provide professional guidance.  Find your local MDC contact at mdc.mo.gov.
  • Visit www.moinvasives.org to find more invasive plant resources from the Missouri Invasive Plant Task Force.

 

Protect Our Places

bush honeysuckle illustrations

Bush honeysuckle identification illustrations by Jan Weaver

Trial of Bush Honeysuckle

by Tina Casagrand 0 Comments

[pdf-embedder url=”http://moinvasives.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/HS-Trial-Flyer2018-3Color.pdf” title=”HS Trial Flyer2018 – 3Color”]

Please Note: This trial is for education, yet the foundations of the trial can lead toward actual litigation.
Respecting the role of the judicial system to bring about change and honoring the history of the place the trial is taking  place in are of great importance.
This is just a little bit of information but spread the word.

Honeysuckle Sweep, St. Louis region

by Tina Casagrand 0 Comments
Honeysuckle Sweep, St. Louis region

In an effort to energize the greater St. Louis region around improving habitat for our native plants and animals, area conservation organizations join together to spotlight invasive bush honeysuckle and the need to remove it so that large swaths of land can become productive areas for native habitat, recreation and enjoyment. To that end, organizations will host public events and volunteer removal days during Honeysuckle Sweep Weeks.

2018 Honeysuckle Sweep Weeks will be :

Spring: March 3–18, 2018

Fall: October 27–November 11, 2018

Spotlight on Emmenegger Nature Park invasive plant efforts

by MoIP 0 Comments
From Gwyn Wahlmann:
Emmenegger Nature Park is a 110-acre wooded park in Kirkwood, Missouri, located on the Meramec River and endowed with unusual natural beauty and biological diversity.
As an “adopt-a-park” subset of Kirkwood Parks Assistance Corps (KPAC), a small crew of regular volunteers has been removing honeysuckle at Emmenegger for 4-5 years.  We have worked every Sunday, March through May, and September through November.  Two of our crew also work there during the week throughout the seasons.
Upon occasion we have been joined by students from Kirkwood High School and Meramec Community College, and volunteer participants with Biodiversity St. Louis “Honeysuckle Sweep Week.”
It would be impossible to know how many honeysuckle shrubs we’ve removed, but like most natural areas in the St. Louis region, the park was heavily infested.  An estimate from Kirkwood Parks Department is that we’ve cleared about a third of the park, as many as 30 acres.
We also remove euonymus, garlic mustard, Callery Pear, Burning Bush, Japanese Beefsteak Plant and other known exotic invasives.
Visit our page for MoIP invasive plant case sites, including detailed management procedures and “before and after” photos.